ANNEGRET FALKNER PHD

Assistant Professor

Annegret received her PhD from Columbia University in 2012 working with Mickey Goldberg on oculomotor decision-making in primates, and worked with Dayu Lin at NYU for her postdoc examining aggressive motivation in rodents.
Email: afalkner@princeton.edu

STEFAN OLINE PHD

Associate Professional Specialist

Stefan received his PhD in 2015 from the lab of Mike Burger at Lehigh University.  He worked with Mike Halassa at NYU and MIT optimizing tools for physiology and photometry.

Email: soline@princeton.edu

MAE GUTHMAN PHD

Postdoctoral Fellow

Mae received her PhD from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in 2019 working with Molly Huntsman and Diego Restrepo on the cell-type specific control exerted by GABAergic interneurons on the microcircuitry and plasticity of the mouse basolateral amygdala. Broadly, she is interested in the role of and mechanisms underlying neuromodulatory coordination of neural circuits during social behaviors. Her postdoctoral research focuses on the role of estrogen in orchestrating the activity of neurons during various social behaviors in mice.

Email: eguthman@princeton.edu

LINDSAY WILLMORE

Graduate Student NSF GRFP Fellow

Lindsay completed her bachelor's degree in Computer Science while studying neural transcriptomics and spatial navigation in the Bejerano and Giocomo labs at Stanford. Following college, she spent two years doing drug discovery and basic structural biology research at D. E. Shaw Research. Her thesis work investigates the neural and hormonal underpinnings of depressive states evoked by chronic social defeat stress.

Email: willmore@princeton.edu

TOMOHITO MINAKUCHI

Graduate Student

Tomohito (Tomo) completed his medical degree at Keio University, Tokyo, Japan. In his medical school, he got training in molecular biology in the Siomi lab, and circuitry neuroscience in the Tanaka & Takata lab. He also worked with Dr Hideyuki Okano, performing calcium imaging of rat and marmoset cortex after graduating.

Email: tomohito - at - princeton.edu

DAKOTA BLACKMAN

Graduate Student

Dakota completed her bachelor’s degree in Neuroscience at Barnard College, where she worked with Josh Gordon and Elizabeth Bauer, studying the neural circuitry and molecular mechanisms underlying anxiety. After graduating, she spent two years working as a Research Assistant at Rockefeller University with Winrich Freiwald and Eric Schmidt, with the goal of developing and applying molecular profiling techniques to projection neurons relevant to social cognition.

Email: dakotab@princeton.edu

JORGE IRAVEDRA GARCIA

Graduate Student

Jorge completed his bachelor’s degree in Molecular Biology at University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras. He worked in the laboratory of Dr. Gregory Quirk researching how circuits from the prefrontal cortex to the amygdala and striatum regulate active avoidance. His graduate work currently focuses on investigating how subcortical brain networks regulate drive and reinforcement of social behaviors.
Email: jmig@princeton.edu

KEN IGARZA

Graduate Student NSF GRFP Fellow

Ken received his B.S. in Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology from Emory University. Here, he worked with Dr. Gary Miller to study the molecular underpinnings of Parkinson’s Disease as an IMSD scholar. Later as an HHMI-EXROP fellow in Dr. Richard Axel’s lab at Columbia University, Ken studied how command neurons in the fruit fly integrate sensory information and internal states to execute courtship behavior. Now an NSF Graduate Research Fellow in the Falkner lab, Ken is pursuing his graduate work to explore the neural basis of divergent motivational states in mice.

Email: kigarza@princeton.edu

GRAY SEILER

Research Technician

Gray completed her BSc in Neuroscience at the University of St Andrews, where she worked with Dr Gayle Doherty and investigated a novel agent and its ability to induce differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. She volunteered with the Mena Lab at Rutgers University, and was a summer student with the Murray Lab at the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre where she investigated monosynaptic inputs to the LVN. She joined the Falkner Lab in November 2020 and is excited to contribute to the lab’s work in further understanding the underlying neural mechanisms that drive social behaviours.

Email: ms4713@princeton.edu

PATRICIA CHEN

PNI Undergraduate

Patricia Chen is a junior pursuing a concentration in Neuroscience with certificates in Cognitive Science and Teacher Preparation. She is interested in the social behavior of living organisms particularly through manifestations of the brain. 

Email: pc14@princeton.edu

©2018 by Falkner Lab. Proudly created with Wix.com